Alzheimer's Association (July 25, 2018): Study Shows Intensive Blood Pressure Control Reduces Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) & the Combined Risk of MCI and Dementia

July 26, 2018

Significant reductions in the risk of mild cognitive impairment (MCI)*, and the combination of MCI and dementia**, have been shown for the first time through aggressive lowering of systolic blood pressure in new research results from the federally-funded SPRINT MIND Study reported at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) 2018 in Chicago.

“This is the first randomized clinical trial to demonstrate a reduction in new cases of MCI alone and the combined risk of MCI plus all-cause dementia,” said Jeff D. Williamson, MD, MHS, Professor of Internal Medicine and Epidemiology and Chief, Section on Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine at Wake Forest School of Medicine. Williamson reported these results at AAIC 2018.

The results of this large-scale, long-term clinical trial provide the strongest evidence to date about reducing risk of MCI and dementia through the treatment of high blood pressure, which is one of the leading causes of cardiovascular disease worldwide.

“This study shows more conclusively than ever before that there are things you can do - especially regarding cardiovascular disease risk factors - to reduce your risk of MCI and dementia,” said Maria C. Carrillo, PhD, Alzheimer’s Association Chief Science Officer. “To reduce new cases of MCI and dementia globally we must do everything we can - as professionals and individuals - to reduce blood pressure to the levels indicated in this study, which we know is beneficial to cardiovascular risk.”

Carrillo pointed out that these results fit well with recent population data showing reductions in new cases of dementia in developed Western cultures. These lower rates of dementia may be occurring as these societies have begun to improve control of cardiovascular disease risk factors through medication management, reducing smoking, and greater awareness of healthy lifestyle.

https://alz.org/aaic/releases_2018/AAIC18-Wed-developing-topics.asp