Dementia in the News

October 17, 2019

USA Today (October 10, 2019): Women may be Under-Diagnosed for Alzheimer’s, While Men Over-Diagnosed, New Study Suggests

Doctors may be not be diagnosing women as early as men with brain problems associated with early signs of dementia because of how well women typically perform on simple memory tests, a study published Wednesday suggests. 

October 17, 2019

Harvard Gazette (October 16, 2019): In a First, Scientists Pinpoint Neural Activity’s Role in Human Longevity

The brain’s neural activity — long implicated in disorders ranging from dementia to epilepsy — also plays a role in human aging and life span, according to research led by scientists in the Blavatnik Institute at Harvard Medical School (HMS).

The study, published today in Nature, is based on findings from human brains, mice, and worms and suggests that excessive activity in the brain is linked to shorter life spans, while suppressing such overactivity extends life.

September 23, 2019

Wall Street Journal (September 23, 2019): Her Alzheimer’s Research Includes Her Husband

As a lifelong Alzheimer’s researcher, Dorene Rentz sees many brain scans with amyloid plaques, a telltale sign of the disease that ravages the brains and memories of its victims.

But there’s one scan she’s unable to see: that of her husband, Ray Berggren.

Never did she think that one day her 73-year-old husband would be part of a clinical trial she helped design, whose overall cognitive outcomes she will eventually help analyze.

September 19, 2019

TIME (September 19, 2019): How I Learned to Be a Better Doctor From My Wife’s Struggle With Alzheimer’s

Arthur Kleinman, MD, is the author of The Soul of Care: The Moral Education of a Husband and a Doctor. He is one of the most renowned and influential scholars and writers on psychiatry, anthropology, global health, and cultural issues in medicine. Educated at Stanford University and Stanford Medical School, he has taught at Harvard for over forty years.

September 17, 2019

Massachusetts General Hospital (August 17, 2019): Program Aims to Support Alzheimer's Caregivers

In the fall of 2011, one month shy of his 59th birthday, Steve Johanson was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s disease. Faced with “his worst nightmare,” Steve, a construction project manager from Watertown, Massachusetts, and his wife Judy, a family daycare provider, decided to face the disease together. For the next six years, the couple sought advice from doctors, visited museums, took gardening classes and surrounded themselves with family. But by the spring of 2017, things had started to unravel.

September 3, 2019

Being Patient (September 3, 2019): End Stage Alzheimer’s: What to Expect and How to Build Resiliency

Alzheimer’s disease can be a long haul, with some symptoms taking years and even decades to progress. By the time a patient is in end stage Alzheimer’s, however, the signs are clear. They’ve progressed to severe dementia, and will likely need around-the-clock care for physical and mental needs.

August 30, 2019

WEARTV (August 30, 2019): Alzheimer's Foundation of American Offers Caregivers Tips Ahead of Hurricane Dorian

Do you know how to protect your loved ones with Alzheimer if a natural disaster would strike the area?

Alzheimer's Foundation of American (AFA) has created an emergency preparedness checklist for Alzheimer's caregivers in the case that a storm would strike their area.

August 30, 2019

The Jewish News (August 30, 2019): Lewy Body Dementia Explored

Lewy Body Dementia (LBD) is a complex, challenging brain disorder that affects many parts of the brain. Although less known than its “cousins” Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, it affects 1.4 million Americans.

Where Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia, it is followed by LBD and then Parkinson’s. Henry Paulson, M.D., Ph. D., University of Michigan, says: “Despite the prevalence of Lewy Body Dementia, confirming it can be challenging for doctors and patients alike.”

August 26, 2019

BBC News (August 25, 2019): 'There was no hope': Treatable Disease Often Mistaken for Alzheimer's

A few years ago, John Searle thought his life as he knew it was over.

His body had slowly stopped working. He had trouble walking, he was falling down, he had bad short-term memory and, at 69, he was incontinent.

It was a pattern of decline the retired Canadian engineer from Brantford, Ontario was all too familiar with. His own sister had died of Alzheimer's in her 50s. His father had died of dementia in his early 80s. So he began to start planning for a future he would not be able to participate in.

August 16, 2019

The Patriot Ledger (August 13, 2019): MIT, MGH Scientists Report New Insight into Alzheimer’s

Scientists at MIT and MGH have gained new clues into the role of the brain’s blood-brain barrier in Alzheimer’s disease. Recent research has found that damage from Alzheimer’s allows toxins to enter the brain, further harming neurons.

The results are being used to try and develop new drugs to solidify the blood-brain barrier.

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